Do Ladybugs Bite?

Do Ladybugs Bite? Although they are often considered beneficial bugs in the garden, a ladybug bite is anything but advantageous for the unlucky person on the receiving end. It stings and leaves a mark. But is this something you should worry about? Are ladybugs dangerous to humans? Or are ladybugs harmful to the plants they sometimes overwhelm? Here’s what you need to know.

Ladybug danger Ladybugs are indeed capable of biting humans. More often than not, they prefer not to bite, but when they do, ladybugs bite with surprisingly sharp mouthparts. Instead of biting, these multicolored, spotted insects will often bleed on a person, releasing a pungent odor that wards off most prey. This blood is generally mistaken for another type of bodily secretion, but no matter what you think it is, one thing is clear when it happens: the ladybug isn’t enjoying its time with you.

Still, ladybug bites aren’t poisonous or deadly, and no blood meal is taken. They can’t transmit any parasites or diseases, but they can be a real pain – literally. Bites from a ladybug often result in a raised red bump that may hurt for a few days. But other than that, the biting mouthparts of this insect rarely have the force required to break through skin. Still, as with virtually any insect, some people are allergic to ladybug bites, and might develop a reaction. If you develop a rash, infection or unusual swelling, seek medical attention.

Other concerns Due to the infrequency with which ladybugs chomp down on humans, their overwintering and gathering habits are much more concerning to homeowners. In some parts of the country, it’s not uncommon to see thousands of ladybugs congregating around just one house. As numbers increase, so does the risk that you or your family members will get bitten by a ladybug.

At the first sign of a ladybug problem, call Terminix® and reduce the chances of receiving ladybug bites in and around your home.